lifeis4chumps:

no why

(via cutiebum)

dendropsyche:

andromeda4002019:

i got this at an art museum from a vending machine with boxes of tiny art inside. u didnt know what u were gonna get. i straight up paid $3 for this

Not a dime wasted

dendropsyche:

andromeda4002019:

i got this at an art museum from a vending machine with boxes of tiny art inside. u didnt know what u were gonna get. i straight up paid $3 for this

Not a dime wasted

(via secretpxrf)

zohbugg:

blindtank:

sanziene:

x

I dont normally post/reblog stuff like this, but jeasus christ im dying.

WATCH THE VIDEO OMG HAHAHA

(via devonasinternetspew)

beben-eleben:

How to get a boyfriendLevel: Asian

beben-eleben:

How to get a boyfriend
Level: Asian

(via future-film-maker)

eziocauthon89:

safetytank:

i mISTOOK THE POLE CAP FOR PART OF ITS FACE


SO DID I

eziocauthon89:

safetytank:

i mISTOOK THE POLE CAP FOR PART OF ITS FACE

SO DID I

(via secretpxrf)

barkbarkbarkbarkbarkbarkbarkbark:

That weird 10 seconds of good animation in an episode always weirds me out.

(via secretpxrf)

thatfunnyblog:

 

Ingenuity.

I AM DONE

(via future-film-maker)

astrotastic:

poopsonthemoon:

funnyandhilarious:

Star Trek Stabilized »

Now my favourite gif.

turn down for what

astrotastic:

poopsonthemoon:

funnyandhilarious:

Star Trek Stabilized »

Now my favourite gif.

turn down for what

foomod:

rocketbeagle0:

rocketbeagle0:

I JUST FOUND OUT THAT HUNDRED OF METERS UNDER THE SEA, THERE IS A LIVING BEING THAT IS LITERALLY JUST A FLOATING BUTT

LOOK

image

IT’S CALLED THE PIGBUTT WORM I JUST SHOWED IT TO MY PARENTS I CANT FUCKING BELIEVE

Hundred meters under the sea scientists have discovered

The booty

(via secretpxrf)

ghostonthenet:

madapplemad:

Artist - 池上のろし

This is just f’ing beautiful.  It’s all of The Majors!

Fucking kudos to you there, artist.

[Yes, before fans of this blog point it out to me.  I know it’s not ALL of The Majors.  There are a bunch of male guerrilla fighters, Scylla, and that one dude that ran the Solid State that are missing, etc.  But this is at least all of the ‘major’ Majors. ;p   Or to be more precise, it’s ALL of the Motokos.]

(via devonasinternetspew)

spring-of-mathematics:

One of applications of “slope” to explain puzzles and paradoxes -
Triangle Dissection Paradox

"Below the two parts moved around - The partilisions are exactly the same, as those used above - From where "come" this hole?"

Explain: In the figure, the slope of the “hypotenuse” in figure 1 and figure 2 are completely different. (Click on image to see full size).

Also, The above two figures are rearrangements of each other, with the corresponding triangles and polyominoes having the same areas. Nevertheless, the bottom figure has an area one unit larger than the top figure (as indicated by the grid square containing the dot).The source of this apparent paradox is that the “hypotenuse” of the overall “triangle” is not a straight line, but consists of two broken segments. As a result, the “hypotenuse” of the top figure is slightly bent in, whereas the “hypotenuse” of the bottom figure is slightly bent out. The difference in the areas of these figures is then exactly the “extra” one unit. Explicitly, the area of triangular “hole” (0, 0), (8, 3), (13, 5) in the top figure is 1/2, as is the area of triangular “excess” (0, 0), (5, 2), (13, 5) in the bottom figure, for a total of one unit difference. Source: Triangle Dissection Paradox on Mathworld.wolfram.

  • Slope:  In mathematics, the slope or gradient of a line is a number that describes both the direction and the steepness of the line. Slope is often denoted by the letter m. Slope is calculated by finding the ratio of the “vertical change” to the “horizontal change” between (any) two distinct points on a line. Sometimes the ratio is expressed as a quotient (“rise over run”), giving the same number for every two distinct points on the same line. The rise of a road between two points is the difference between the altitude of the road at those two points, say y1 and y2, or in other words, the rise is (y2 − y1) = Δy. For relatively short distances - where the earth’s curvature may be neglected, the run is the difference in distance from a fixed point measured along a level, horizontal line, or in other words, the run is (x2 − x1) = Δx. Here the slope of the road between the two points is simply described as the ratio of the altitude change to the horizontal distance between any two points on the line.
  • Also, here are the direction of a line is either increasing, decreasing, horizontal or vertical:

        - A line is increasing if it goes up from left to right. The slope is positive, i.e. m>0.
       -  A line is decreasing if it goes down from left to right. The slope is negative, i.e. m<0.

       -  If a line is horizontal the slope is zero. This is a constant  function.
       -  If a line is vertical the slope is undefined (see below).

    The steepness, incline, or grade of a line is measured by the absolute value of the slope. A slope with a greater absolute value indicates a steeper line - Source: Slope on Wikipedia

(via likeaphysicist)

matthen:

A roulette traced from rolling an ellipse inside a circle. [thanks] [code]

matthen:

A roulette traced from rolling an ellipse inside a circle. [thanks] [code]

mindblowingscience:

Ocean Acidification is Robbing Sharks of Their Predatory Senses

It has long been known that sharks, as apex predators, can practically smell the fear of their prey as they stalk the ocean’s depths. But new research is suggesting that that might all soon change, as the increasing acidification of ocean waters could be robbing sharks of their ability to sense the smell of food.
In a study recently published in the journal Global Change Biology, researchers found that after swimming in a pool of water treated with elevated levels of carbon dioxide, adult smooth dogfish - a small breed of shark - could no longer track the odor of prey, which was in this case released squid odor.
Disturbingly, the carbon dioxide concentrations used in the experiment are consistent with levels that have been forecasted for 2050 to 2100.
"The sharks’ tracking behavior and attacking behavior were significantly reduced," Danielle Dixson, who took part in the study, said in a recent release. “Sharks are like swimming noses, so chemical cues are really important for them in terms of finding food.”
And those chemical cues are apparently shrouded in the wake of high acidity, leaving sharks confused and less aggressive when dealing with prey. Imagine someone is dangling a freshly cooked steak right in front of your face, but for some reason you can’t smell it’s succulent aroma - you would be hesitant about eating it too.
Ocean acidification traditionally occurrs when carbon dioxide - a relatively potent greenhouse gas - is absorbed by ocean waters. There it dissolves and passively lowers the pH of the water, causing it to become more acidic.
Past research has found that acidic waters can disrupt a nervous system receptor called GABAA.
In the case of sharks, neurons no longer fire properly for the fish’s sense of smell.
In the experiment, sharks from the high carbon dioxide pool spent less than 15 percent of their time in the water stream containing food stimulus, while a control group spent more than 60 percent of their time in the stream, looking for a tasty snack.
The researchers are quick to add that sharks are superior predators, and don’t simply use their sense of smell to hunt. They can even adapt to acidic waters over time.
However, “it’s the rate of change that’s happening that’s concerning,” Dixson added. “Sharks have never had to deal with [increasing acidity] this fast.”

mindblowingscience:

Ocean Acidification is Robbing Sharks of Their Predatory Senses

It has long been known that sharks, as apex predators, can practically smell the fear of their prey as they stalk the ocean’s depths. But new research is suggesting that that might all soon change, as the increasing acidification of ocean waters could be robbing sharks of their ability to sense the smell of food.

In a study recently published in the journal Global Change Biology, researchers found that after swimming in a pool of water treated with elevated levels of carbon dioxide, adult smooth dogfish - a small breed of shark - could no longer track the odor of prey, which was in this case released squid odor.

Disturbingly, the carbon dioxide concentrations used in the experiment are consistent with levels that have been forecasted for 2050 to 2100.

"The sharks’ tracking behavior and attacking behavior were significantly reduced," Danielle Dixson, who took part in the study, said in a recent release. “Sharks are like swimming noses, so chemical cues are really important for them in terms of finding food.”

And those chemical cues are apparently shrouded in the wake of high acidity, leaving sharks confused and less aggressive when dealing with prey. Imagine someone is dangling a freshly cooked steak right in front of your face, but for some reason you can’t smell it’s succulent aroma - you would be hesitant about eating it too.

Ocean acidification traditionally occurrs when carbon dioxide - a relatively potent greenhouse gas - is absorbed by ocean waters. There it dissolves and passively lowers the pH of the water, causing it to become more acidic.

Past research has found that acidic waters can disrupt a nervous system receptor called GABAA.

In the case of sharks, neurons no longer fire properly for the fish’s sense of smell.

In the experiment, sharks from the high carbon dioxide pool spent less than 15 percent of their time in the water stream containing food stimulus, while a control group spent more than 60 percent of their time in the stream, looking for a tasty snack.

The researchers are quick to add that sharks are superior predators, and don’t simply use their sense of smell to hunt. They can even adapt to acidic waters over time.

However, “it’s the rate of change that’s happening that’s concerning,” Dixson added. “Sharks have never had to deal with [increasing acidity] this fast.”

1ll-society:

Frank Frazettaselected by 1ll-society

1ll-society:

Frank Frazetta
selected by 1ll-society

ucresearch:

The blood falls of Antarctica

In some remote regions of the antarctic there are glaciers that appear to be bleeding.  This makes for a stunning visual on the bright white snow, but what is going on here?  

The falls are actually the product of a subglacial lake that is seeping out from a rupture in the glacier.  The red color comes from the microbes living in the dark cold lake that use iron to produce energy (think rust).  Scientists think that this population of organisms have been able to evolve separately from the rest of the world for over 1.5 million years.

UC Santa Cruz glaciologist Slawek Tulaczyk studies these types of environments and says they’re great for theorizing life on other planets:

A place like this would be as close of an analog as we can find on this planet for subpermafrost life habitats on Mars.

Tulaczyk and his team drill into Antarctic ice in the hopes of finding these types of ecosystems deep below the surface.  

Read more about Blood Falls here

(via mindblowingscience)