watermel0n-smile:

he just accepts it, not even surprised by it. must happen all the time

watermel0n-smile:

he just accepts it, not even surprised by it. must happen all the time

(via kanawaticonquest)

earthmoth:

Little baby

earthmoth:

Little baby

(via natures-queen)

compoundchem:

Today’s graphic considers the different chemical compounds in lipstick - including a compound commonly found in chilli peppers, and a pigment derived from scale insects. Read more & see a larger version of the graphic on the site: http://wp.me/s4aPLT-lipstick

compoundchem:

Today’s graphic considers the different chemical compounds in lipstick - including a compound commonly found in chilli peppers, and a pigment derived from scale insects. 

Read more & see a larger version of the graphic on the site: http://wp.me/s4aPLT-lipstick

(via mindblowingscience)

sciencesoup:

What’s up with all those giant volcanoes on Mars?
Mount Everest is an enormous and awe-inspiring sight, towering 9 kilometres above the Earth’s surface. But if you were to stick it on Mars right next to Olympus Mons, the largest volcano in the solar system, it would look foolishly small—Olympus Mons triples the height of Everest and spans the state of Arizona.
Mars is sprinkled with huge volcanoes, hundreds of kilometres in diameter and dozens of kilometres tall. The largest volcano on Earth, on the other hand, is Mauna Loa in Hawaii, which rises only 4 km above sea level.
So why is Mars blessed with these monsters of the solar system? Why doesn’t Earth have any massive lava-spewing structures?
Geology, my friends.
Earth’s crust is split up into plates that move and collide. Usually, volcanoes are formed at the boundaries where two plates meet, and one subducts below the other and melts in the heat below the surface. This melt rises as magma and causes volcanism.
But in some places on Earth, there are “hot spots” in the middle of plates, where magma rises up from the core-mantle mantle in plumes. When this magma is spewed up onto the surface, it cools and solidifies into rock, and over the years, the rock builds up and up. When plumes open out in the middle of the ocean, the magma builds islands.

Plumes are fixed, always pushing magma up to one spot, but the Earth’s plates don’t stop for anything. While the magma rises, the plates move over the hotspot—at a rate of only a few centimetres a year, but still, they move and take the newly-made volcanoes with them. So, gradually, the plates and volcanoes move on, while the plume remains in the same spot, building a whole new volcano on the next bit of the plate. As the plate moves on and on, the plume builds up a whole chain of islands, called island arcs. This is how the Hawaiian Islands were formed.

The island-volcanoes never get too big, because the plates keep moving onwards. On Mars, however, the volcanoes are enormous because the magma appears to keep rising, cooling and solidifying in the same place, taking its sweet time to build up colossal mounds of volcanic rock kilometres high.
So far, we’ve seen no volcanic arcs like we do on Earth, and this is generally taken as evidence that Mars has no tectonic plates.

sciencesoup:

What’s up with all those giant volcanoes on Mars?

Mount Everest is an enormous and awe-inspiring sight, towering 9 kilometres above the Earth’s surface. But if you were to stick it on Mars right next to Olympus Mons, the largest volcano in the solar system, it would look foolishly small—Olympus Mons triples the height of Everest and spans the state of Arizona.

Mars is sprinkled with huge volcanoes, hundreds of kilometres in diameter and dozens of kilometres tall. The largest volcano on Earth, on the other hand, is Mauna Loa in Hawaii, which rises only 4 km above sea level.

So why is Mars blessed with these monsters of the solar system? Why doesn’t Earth have any massive lava-spewing structures?

Geology, my friends.

Earth’s crust is split up into plates that move and collide. Usually, volcanoes are formed at the boundaries where two plates meet, and one subducts below the other and melts in the heat below the surface. This melt rises as magma and causes volcanism.

But in some places on Earth, there are “hot spots” in the middle of plates, where magma rises up from the core-mantle mantle in plumes. When this magma is spewed up onto the surface, it cools and solidifies into rock, and over the years, the rock builds up and up. When plumes open out in the middle of the ocean, the magma builds islands.

image

Plumes are fixed, always pushing magma up to one spot, but the Earth’s plates don’t stop for anything. While the magma rises, the plates move over the hotspot—at a rate of only a few centimetres a year, but still, they move and take the newly-made volcanoes with them. So, gradually, the plates and volcanoes move on, while the plume remains in the same spot, building a whole new volcano on the next bit of the plate. As the plate moves on and on, the plume builds up a whole chain of islands, called island arcs. This is how the Hawaiian Islands were formed.

image

The island-volcanoes never get too big, because the plates keep moving onwards. On Mars, however, the volcanoes are enormous because the magma appears to keep rising, cooling and solidifying in the same place, taking its sweet time to build up colossal mounds of volcanic rock kilometres high.

So far, we’ve seen no volcanic arcs like we do on Earth, and this is generally taken as evidence that Mars has no tectonic plates.

(via mindblowingscience)

logikblok-blog:

Saturn’s moons Rhea and Epimetheus transiting.

Saturn has a great many more moons than our planet – a whopping 62. A single moon, Titan, accounts for an overwhelming 96% of all the material orbiting the planet, with a group of six other smaller moons dominating the rest. The other 55 small satellites whizzing around Saturn make up the tiny remainder along with the gas giant’s famous rings.
One of the subjects of this Cassini image, Rhea, belongs to that group of dominating six. Set against a backdrop showing Saturn and its intricate system of icy rings, Rhea dominates the scene and dwarfs its tiny companion, one of the 55 small satellites known as Epimetheus.
Although they appear to be close to one another, this is a trick of perspective – this view was obtained when Cassini was some 1.2 million km from Rhea, and 1.6 million km from Epimetheus, meaning the moons themselves had a hefty separation of 400 000 km.
However, even if they were nearer to each other, Rhea would still loom large over Epimetheus: at 1528 km across and just under half the size of our own Moon, Rhea is well over 10 times the size of Epimetheus, which is a modest 113 km across.
 As is traditional for the earliest discovered moons of Saturn, both are named after figures from Greek mythology: the Titan Rhea (“mother of the gods”) and Prometheus’ brother Epimetheus (“after thinker” or “hindsight”).

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute, G. Ugarković
Read more about Cassini and it’s mission here. Logikblok.

logikblok-blog:

Saturn’s moons Rhea and Epimetheus transiting.

Saturn has a great many more moons than our planet – a whopping 62. A single moon, Titan, accounts for an overwhelming 96% of all the material orbiting the planet, with a group of six other smaller moons dominating the rest. The other 55 small satellites whizzing around Saturn make up the tiny remainder along with the gas giant’s famous rings.

One of the subjects of this Cassini image, Rhea, belongs to that group of dominating six. Set against a backdrop showing Saturn and its intricate system of icy rings, Rhea dominates the scene and dwarfs its tiny companion, one of the 55 small satellites known as Epimetheus.

Although they appear to be close to one another, this is a trick of perspective – this view was obtained when Cassini was some 1.2 million km from Rhea, and 1.6 million km from Epimetheus, meaning the moons themselves had a hefty separation of 400 000 km.

However, even if they were nearer to each other, Rhea would still loom large over Epimetheus: at 1528 km across and just under half the size of our own Moon, Rhea is well over 10 times the size of Epimetheus, which is a modest 113 km across.

 As is traditional for the earliest discovered moons of Saturn, both are named after figures from Greek mythology: the Titan Rhea (“mother of the gods”) and Prometheus’ brother Epimetheus (“after thinker” or “hindsight”).

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute, G. Ugarković

Read more about Cassini and it’s mission here. Logikblok.

(via mindblowingscience)

cybergata:

"Ready for Take off!"  Happy Aviation Cat

cybergata:

"Ready for Take off!"  Happy Aviation Cat

(via inushige)

spacetravelco:

Physics prints by Justin VanGenderen

Available here & here.

(via mindblowingscience)

thegeek531:

thepurpleglass:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

cheskamouse:

I think he is catting enough for two, maybe three cats.

MAXIMUM CAT

Cat. It is a verb now. And you know exactly what it means. Thanks, internet.

CATTING INTENSIFIES

thegeek531:

thepurpleglass:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

cheskamouse:

I think he is catting enough for two, maybe three cats.

MAXIMUM CAT

Cat. It is a verb now. And you know exactly what it means. Thanks, internet.

CATTING INTENSIFIES

(via cutiebum)

astronomy-to-zoology:

White-lipped Peccary (Tayassu pecari)
…a species of peccary (Tayassuidae) which occurs in most of Central and South America, excluding Chile, Uruguay, southern Argentina, and northern Mexico. White-lipped peccaries are diurnal (daytime) feeders and will forage for roots, grasses, seeds, fruit, etc in diverse groups which can range from 20-300 individuals. 
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Mammalia-Artiodactyla-Tayassuidae-Tayassu-T. pecari
Image: Chrumps

astronomy-to-zoology:

White-lipped Peccary (Tayassu pecari)

…a species of peccary (Tayassuidae) which occurs in most of Central and South America, excluding Chile, Uruguay, southern Argentina, and northern Mexico. White-lipped peccaries are diurnal (daytime) feeders and will forage for roots, grasses, seeds, fruit, etc in diverse groups which can range from 20-300 individuals. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Mammalia-Artiodactyla-Tayassuidae-Tayassu-T. pecari

Image: Chrumps

cool-critters:

Eurasian water shrew (Neomys fodiens)

The Eurasian water shrew is a relatively large shrew, up to 10 cm (4 in) long, with a tail up to three-quarters as long again. It lives close to fresh water, hunting aquatic prey in the water and nearby. Its fur traps bubbles of air in the water which greatly aids its buoyancy, but requires it to anchor itself to remain underwater for more than the briefest of dives.

Like many shrews, the water shrew has venomous saliva, making it one of the few venomous mammals, although it is not able to puncture the skin of large animals such as humans. Highly territorial, it lives a solitary life and is found throughout the northern part of Europe and Asia, from Britain to Korea. The Eurasian water shrew is active both night and day.

photo credits: itsnature, bioweb

(via mindblowingscience)

squidscientistas:

The Nyholm lab needs your support!  We’re launching a crowdfunding campaign to support our research on the Hawaiian Bobtail squid/Vibrio fischeri symbiosis!  If you love cephalopods please share!
https://experiment.com/projects/how-do-bobtail-squid-choose-their-glowing-bacterial-partner

squidscientistas:

The Nyholm lab needs your support!  We’re launching a crowdfunding campaign to support our research on the Hawaiian Bobtail squid/Vibrio fischeri symbiosis!  If you love cephalopods please share!

https://experiment.com/projects/how-do-bobtail-squid-choose-their-glowing-bacterial-partner

(via mindblowingscience)